From the editors’ laptops

by Vijay Govind Nath. Walter Lord’s ‘A Night to Remember’ is the definitive non-fiction account of the sinking of the Titanic. The book recounts how in the early hours of April 15, 1912, the largest ship to ever set sail, sank into the depths of the Atlantic along with 1,500 Read more…

Reflections on footwear

From the Editorial Team (Dr. Meera Baindur). While ruminating on the phenomenon of walking barefoot, my thoughts turned to footwear. I was wondering while we did throw away the excess baggage of the metaphorical footwear, we do have close connections between footwear and philosophy. Let me recount for you two Read more…

A Utilitarian View of Homosexuality

by Dr Ananya Barua & Aradhana Gupta. Sexuality is a complex phenomenon, particularly when looked at from a social perspective. This is primarily because the various dimensions of sexuality are not alike in all individuals. This is to say that everyone exhibits a variety of different desires and behaviors that Read more…

The Philosophy of Philistines

by Ezat Mossallanejad. In his masterpiece “The Bridge over the Drina”, the Yugoslav novelist Ivo Andric, speaks of a Turkish foreman who orders death sentence by means of horrible techniques of torture against a Bosnian worker due to his alleged attempts at rebellion: “Everything must be made ready so that Read more…

Non-human Ethics

by Nitesh Anchan. Introduction How should humans treat non-human beings? In other words, what is the correct or right mode of action towards members of non-human species? The ‘how’ question, i.e. how to treat non-human beings, relies on the ‘what’ question, i.e. what ‘are’ non-human beings. The ‘what’ question is Read more…

‘Philosophy and the Public’

By Sundar Sarukkai. “Philosophy, from its earliest origins whether in India or Greece, was always a form of public discourse. The aims of philosophy were about addressing individual and social concerns, which included questions of the nature of the real, knowledge, truth, freedom, soul, god and so on. If there Read more…

Doing Philosophy with Kids

by Mansi Rathour. In the summer of 2019, the team at Barefoot Philosophers led by Professor Sundar Sarukkai, organized Philosophy Summer Camps for children across various cities in India. The intention of organizing these camps was to introduce children to the practice of critical and philosophical thinking. The first of Read more…

Digitization and Literary Studies

by Kamlakar Bhat. I. Emerging Phenomena of Digital Literature I am ‘writing’ this note on “Digitization and Literary Studies” on my laptop, consulting online resources on my mobile phone. And the reader of this piece may access it through one or the other digital platform. This entire circle of production Read more…

Dissonances: The Myth of Sisyphus

by Kushal Choudhary. An exploration of the ideas pertaining to the 1942 seminal essay ‘The Myth of Sisyphus’ by Albert Camus. The exploration expounds the ideas of what we mean by creating something and what purpose creation of any kind serves. It also alludes to the idea ‘the absurd’ and Read more…

Barefoot

by Sundar Sarukkai Bare is in. All the enlightened souls I meet – mostly those in Delhi academic circles – keep talking about somebody called Agamben and his idea of ‘bare life’. I must confess that I don’t understand what the fuss about this ‘bare life’ is about. Much before Read more…

Why So Serious?

by Sahana Rajan. Why should you care about why you do what you do? Kabir and Meera are having a meal at McDonalds. While Kabir works at Nirvana PrivateLimited, Meera is currently a Professor of Philosophy at Avyaktum University. Kabir hasordered a Chicken Kebab Burger with a Soft Serve Hot Read more…

Consciousness and the need for philosophy

by S. Siddharth. Consciousness and why it is a problem It seems like not a week passes without someone proclaiming that the human mind and consciousness is the final frontier for science, perhaps forever beyond its reach. It’s even more surprising when it is sometimes leading scientists themselves who say Read more…

Self and Another: A Dialogical Relation

by Mahak Uppal. The term “dialogue” is defined by the Oxford online dictionary as “taking part in a conversation or discussion to resolve a problem”. It is derived from the root “dia” meaning “through or across” and “legin” meaning “to speak”. In its most popular usage, therefore, a dialogue is Read more…

Of Gilead

by Anushka Maheshwary. Margaret Atwood in her book The Handmaid’s Tale spins a tale so gripping that it leaves one gasping for air after being submerged in turbulent waters of the totalitarian state of Gilead. It tells the story of the narrator, a woman whose name is later revealed to Read more…

Ethics of Debate

by Chaitanya Joshi & Sushruth Ravish. In present times of partisan divide, each one of us would have experienced at some point or the other, an impasse in a conversation. This is what the Greeks called aporia – a point beyond which no further dialogue seems to be possible. Each Read more…

Certainty in Everyday Life

by Medi Chaithanya. Why are we so certain about some knowledge claims in our everyday life? How do we understand “certainty” in general and in what way does this understanding help us to do things in our day to day life? I was watching a Telugu movie on TV when Read more…

‘Sacred Nature’ in the Upanishads

by Meera Baindur. Abstract When the sages of the Upanishads are speaking of nature and speaking of the sacred they were drawing deep connections between nature, human beings, and life. These insights reveal to us a renewed understanding of the way we should relate to nature that not only realigns Read more…

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